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Different Types of NIH Research Awards

Please keep in mind that the NIH recently made a series of changes to the PHS 398 application form. The Research Assistant contains updated links to this information throughout the site. Follow this link to the latest form, instructions, and overview of changes.

FELLOWSHIPS

Predoctoral

Individual Predoctoral National Research Service Awards for MD/PhD Fellowships-F30

The F30 individual MD/PhD predoctoral fellowship is designed to train future generations of outstanding clinician/scientists committed to pursuing a career in mental health, drug abuse, alcohol abuse and alcoholism, or environmental health sciences research. Applicants must propose to conduct biomedical or behavioral research in areas of high priority/public health significance to mental health, drug abuse and addiction, alcohol abuse and alcoholism, or the environmental health sciences and document that the proposed graduate program and proposed research project offers them an opportunity to develop expert research skills and knowledge leading to a research career in these specific areas. Applicants must be enrolled in an MD/PhD program at an approved medical school, accepted in a related scientific PhD program, and supervised by a mentor in that scientific discipline when the application in submitted. The typical applicant will apply during the first year of medical school for funding to begin in the second year; however, applications may be submitted at any stage of medical school.

The review of an application will focus on the following: the applicant, the research training plan, the sponsor, and the institutional environment/commitment. Awards made under this program announcement will use the F30 mechanism to provide combined medical school and predoctoral PhD support for a maximum of six years; no other predoctoral NRSA (National Research Service Award) support may be received during this time.

Inquires are encouraged and inquired regarding programmatic issues may be directed to:

Tina Vanderveen, PhD
Division of Basic Research
Naitonal Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
6000 Executive Boulevard, Room 402, MSC 7003
Bethesda, MD 20892
Phone: 301-443-2531
Fax: 301-594-0673
Email: tvanderv@willco.niaaa.nih.gov

or

Gary Fleming
Grants Management Branch
National Institute on Drug Abuse
6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 3131, MSC 9541
Bethesda, MD 20892
Phone: 301-443-6710
Fax: 301-443-9127
Email:gf6s@nih.gov



Predoctoral Fellowship Awards for Minority Students—F31 [student, minority]

The goal of this funding mechanism is to ensure that highly trained scientists and physicians will be available in adequate numbers to meet the nation's drug abuse and addiction research needs. To this end, these fellowships will provide up to 5 years of support for research training leading to the PhD or equivalent research degree; the combined MD and PhD degree; or other combined professional study and research PhD degrees in the biomedical or behavioral sciences. These fellowships are for well-qualified students from minority groups found to be under represented in the biomedical and behavioral sciences in the United States. Applicants must be supervised by a mentor.

Funding is for a maximum of 5 years. Continued support beyond the first year is dependent upon satisfactory progress toward the degree. Annual reports are to be provided to the funding agency by both the fellow and his or her academic institution.

Applications are to be submitted on the Individual NRSA grant application form PHS 416-1. The application is completed in two parts: one by the applicant, and the other by the sponsor. In addition, three completed letters of reference are required. If more information is needed, call Dr. Walter Schaffer, Research Training Officer, National Institutes of Health, at (301) 496-9743 or by email at ws11q@nih.gov.

Click here for tips on applying for "F" and "K" series awards.

National Research Service Award Individual Predoctoral Fellowship—F31 [student, supervised]
Grant Instructions

The National Research Service Award Individual Predoctoral Fellowship provides support to predoctoral students who propose to undertake research training in an area of interest to the sponsoring institute. Potential applicants should contact the appropriate institute for a complete Program Announcement, including a statement of allowable research topics. Research training that may be applied toward preparation of a dissertation is permitted during this fellowship.

Applicants should be aware that the F31 program is a training mechanism, not a research mechanism. As such, applicants must propose a research training program that identifies the research skills and knowledge to be acquired during the fellowship period. The research training experience must provide enhancement in research skills under the guidance and supervision of a committed sponsor who is an active and competent investigator in the area of the applicant's proposed research.

Prior to submission of a fellowship application, the applicant must be enrolled in a degree-granting institution and must identify a sponsor to supervise his or her research training.

Applicants should use the PHS 416-1 form to apply for this award.

Potential applicants are encouraged to obtain a complete Program Announcement from the granting institution. The full PA and the application kit may be obtained from the Grants Management branch of the granting institution.

Click here for tips on "F" and "K"' awards.

National Research Service Award (NRSA) Institutional Training Grant—Predoctoral Training [university]
Grant Instructions

NRSA Institutional Training Grants may be awarded to eligible institutions to develop or enhance research training opportunities for individuals, selected by the institution, who are training for careers in specified areas of biomedical and behavioral research. Under the institutional training grant program, support is available for predoctoral training, postdoctoral, and short-term (from 2 to 3 months) research training experiences. Research trainees may fall into one of three categories: (1) currently seeking the PhD degree or a comparable research doctoral degree (Individuals in this category are eligible for predoctoral training support.); (2) already received a PhD, MD, or comparable doctoral degree (postdoctoral support); or (3) health professional students interested in research opportunities (short-term).

An application for a T32 research training grant should be assembled by the institution. The applicant institution must have a strong research program in the area(s) proposed for research training and must have the requisite staff and facilities to carry out the proposed research training program.

Institutional NRSA research training grants may be made for periods up to 5 years. Trainee appointments are typically made in 12-month increments. During the period of training, trainees are required to pursue research training on a full-time basis (at least 40 hours per week).

Applications for this grant should be submitted using the PHS 398 form. Not all institutes support this funding mechanism; check with the appropriate institute before submission. For more information about this funding mechanism and a list of institute contacts, see the PA.

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Bridges to the Doctoral Degree [student, minority]
Grant Instructions

This award provides research training leading to a doctoral degree for students from underrepresented minority groups. The objective is to facilitate the transition of underrepresented minority students into a PhD program after obtaining the MS degree.

Applications may be submitted by domestic, private, and public educational institutions and by State or local systems of higher education. Eligible institutions must have a significant enrollment of underrepresented minorities. Applications must include a partnership between an institution that offers the MS degree and a research-intensive university that provides the PhD degree programs in areas relevant to the biomedical sciences. Click here for Bridges Program institutions. Information about this program is also available at Initiative for Minority Students: Bridges to the Doctoral Degree (click and scroll down).

The project period is 2 to 3 years with funding ranging from $300,000 to $600,000.

For further information, contact:

National Institute of General Medical Sciences
Dr. Irene Eckstrand
Phone: (301) 594-5402
Email: Irene_Eckstrand@nih.gov

Minority Recruitment and Training Program [minority, student, PhD, university, short]
Grant Instructions

The Minority Recruitment and Training Program (MRTP) is sponsored by NIDA's Division of Intramural Research (DIR) in Baltimore, Maryland. It gives talented students (e.g. undergraduates, graduate students, medical students) and faculty an opportunity to work in a lab during the summer with leading intramural scientists. The program, which was started in 1991, has engaged 136 undergraduate, graduate and medical students in research activities at the IRP, NIDA. In this program, students will gain basic science and/or clinical laboratory experience, attend student seminars and participate in a summer participate in summer poster presentation. Participants are competitively selected from across the country. If you would like more information on the MRTP. If you would like more information on the MRTP please contact Dr. Jean Lud Cadet at the NIDA Intramural Research at 410-550-2732 or visit www.drugabuse.gov/DIR/brochure.html.

Research Supplements for Under Represented Minorities [minority, student, PhD]
Grant Instructions

Administrative supplements are available to support students and researchers from underrepresented minority groups who are interested in contributing to NIH research projects. The Research Supplements for Under Represented Minorities program allows PIs holding the NIH research grants to apply for supplements to recruit and support minority investigators and students. Minority students and researchers from high school to the faculty level are eligible to be supported by these supplements.

Researchers and students from underrepresented minority groups who are interested in working under a supplement should first identify a project or PI to work with. NIH program staff may be able to assist candidates in locating potential placements. To apply for an administrative supplement, the grantee institution, on behalf of the PI and in cooperation with the minority researcher, must submit the request for supplemental funds directly to the institution that awarded the parent grant.

An application for a supplement may be submitted at any time. For detailed application instructions and a list of agency contacts, refer to the PA.

Click here for a list of NIH institute staff contacts.

Minority Access to Research Careers Program (MARC)—Faculty Predoctoral Fellowship [minority, student, PhD]
Grant Instructions

The Minority Access to Research Careers Program provides research training opportunities for faculty at 4-year colleges with a substantial enrollment of students from underrepresented minority groups. MARC programs include the MARC Faculty Predoctoral Fellowship and the MARC Senior Faculty Fellowship.

Under these awards, eligible researchers will receive research training outside of their home institution. Fellows may train at any private or public, foreign or domestic research institution with suitable facilities. Training will be conducted under the direction of a sponsor, who must be a faculty member (or equivalent) at the training institution. Upon completion of research training, the faculty member will return to the home institution, with the goal of enhancing the institution's research and research training capabilities.

Support for a Faculty Predoctoral Fellowship is available for up to 5 years, and support for a Senior Faculty Fellowship is available for 1 to 2 academic years. Research training must be conducted in a science field (including mathematics) related to biomedical or behavioral research. To apply for a Faculty Predoctoral Fellowship, an applicant must have been a faculty member of the minority institution for at least 3 years at the time of submitting the application. To apply for a Senior Faculty Fellowship, applicants must have received a PhD or equivalent research degree at least 7 years prior to application submission.

Applications for this fellowship should be submitted on the PHS 416-1 application form and must include a letter of support from the home institution and references. Potential applicants should consult the PA for additional guidelines and information.

To learn more about this program, contact:

Adolphus Toliver, Ph.D.
Minority Access to Research Careers Program
National Institute of General Medical Sciences
National Institutes of Health
Natcher Building 45, Suite 2AS.37
45 Center Drive, MSC 6200
Bethesda, MD 20892-6200
Phone:(301) 594-3900

POSTDOCTORAL

National Research Service Award (NRSA) Institutional Training Grant—Postdoctoral Training [university]
Grant Instructions

NRSA Institutional Training Grants may be awarded to eligible institutions to develop or enhance research training opportunities for individuals, selected by the institution, who are training for careers in specified areas of biomedical and behavioral research. Under the institutional training grant program, support is available for predoctoral training, postdoctoral, and short-term (from 2 to 3 months) research training experiences. Research trainees may fall into one of three categories: (1) currently seeking the PhD degree or a comparable research doctoral degree (Individuals in this category are eligible for predoctoral training support.); (2) already received a PhD, MD, or comparable doctoral degree (postdoctoral support); or (3) health professional students interested in research opportunities (short-term).

An application for a T32 research training grant should be assembled by the institution. The applicant institution must have a strong research program in the area(s) proposed for research training and must have the requisite staff and facilities to carry out the proposed research training program.

Institutional NRSA research training grants may be made for periods up to 5 years. Trainee appointments are typically made in 12-month increments. During the period of training, trainees are required to pursue research training on a full-time basis (at least 40 hours per week).

Applications for this grant should be submitted using the PHS 398 form. Not all institutes support this funding mechanism; check with the appropriate institute before submission. For more information about this funding mechanism and a list of institute contacts, see the PA.

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National Research Service Award for Postdoctoral Fellows—F32 [PhD, supervised, university]
Grant Instructions

This award offers health scientists the opportunity to receive research training in the areas of biomedical, behavioral, or clinical research. Applicants must have received a PhD, MD, DDS, DVM, or equivalent degree by the award start date and have arranged to work with a particular sponsor affiliated with a private or public institution that has the staff and facilities needed for the proposed training.

Stipends are dependent on the level of training and relevant experience. Applicants may receive up to 3 years of support under this mechanism. Fellows must pursue research training on a full-time basis (40 hours a week).

To apply for this grant, fill out the PHS 416-1 and the NIH NRSA Individual Postdoctoral Fellowship Information Statement. Applications may be submitted on April 5, August 5, or December 5, allowing more than 5 to 8 months for completion of the review cycle.

For more information about applying for this award and a list of institute contacts, refer to the PA.

Click here for tips on applying for "F" and "K" series awards.

Career Transition Awards—K22 [PhD, new, supervised]

Career Transition Awards are available from select institutes at the NIH. These awards provide support to an individual postdoctoral fellow interested in transitioning into a faculty position. The overall goal of this award is to enable outstanding individuals to obtain a research training experience at the National Institutes of Health and to facilitate their successful transition to an extramural environment as independent researchers. Most awards include both an intramural (at the NIH campus) and an extramural research component.

Below is a list of NIH institutes that support the K22 award and a link to the PA for each Institute.

National Eye Institute

National Cancer Institute

National Human Genome Research Institute

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

National Institute of Nursing Research

National Institute on Drug Abuse - NIDA Scholars Program, K22

Click here for tips on "F" and "K" awards.

Research Supplements for Under Represented Minorities [minority, student, PhD]
Grant Instructions

Administrative supplements are available to support students and researchers from underrepresented minority groups who are interested in contributing to NIH research projects. The Research Supplements for Under Represented Minorities program allows PIs holding the NIH research grants to apply for supplements to recruit and support minority investigators and students. Minority students and researchers from high school to the faculty level are eligible to be supported by these supplements.

Researchers and students from underrepresented minority groups who are interested in working under a supplement should first identify a project or PI to work with. NIH program staff may be able to assist candidates in locating potential placements. To apply for an administrative supplement, the grantee institution, on behalf of the PI and in cooperation with the minority researcher, must submit the request for supplemental funds directly to the institution that awarded the parent grant.

An application for a supplement may be submitted at any time. For detailed application instructions and a list of agency contacts, refer to the PA.

Click here for a list of NIH institute staff contacts.

SENIOR

Minority Access to Research Careers Program (MARC)—Faculty Senior Fellowship [minority, student, PhD]
Grant Instructions

The Minority Access to Research Careers Program provides research training opportunities for faculty at 4-year colleges with a substantial enrollment of students from underrepresented minority groups. MARC programs include the MARC Faculty Predoctoral Fellowship and the MARC Senior Faculty Fellowship.

Under these awards, eligible researchers will receive research training outside of their home institution. Fellows may train at any private or public, foreign or domestic research institution with suitable facilities. Training will be conducted under the direction of a sponsor, who must be a faculty member (or equivalent) at the training institution. Upon completion of research training, the faculty member will return to the home institution, with the goal of enhancing the institution's research and research training capabilities.

Support for a Faculty Predoctoral Fellowship is available for up to 5 years, and support for a Senior Faculty Fellowship is available for 1 to 2 academic years. Research training must be conducted in a science field (including mathematics) related to biomedical or behavioral research. To apply for a Faculty Predoctoral Fellowship, an applicant must have been a faculty member of the minority institution for at least 3 years at the time of submitting the application. To apply for a Senior Faculty Fellowship, applicants must have received a PhD or equivalent research degree at least 7 years prior to application submission.

Applications for this fellowship should be submitted on the PHS 416-1 application form and must include a letter of support from the home institution and references. Potential applicants should consult the PA for additional guidelines and information.

To learn more about this program, contact:

Adolphus Toliver, Ph.D.
Minority Access to Research Careers Program
National Institute of General Medical Sciences
National Institutes of Health
Natcher Building 45, Suite 2AS.37
45 Center Drive, MSC 6200
Bethesda, MD 20892-6200
Phone: (301) 594-3900

Mentored Awards-Early Career

NIDA Scholars Program-K22

The NIDA Scholars Program (K22) is a two phase (one intramural, the other extramural) program. The purpose of this program is to provide an opportunity for outstanding new investigators to begin their independent research careers (the intramural phase) first within the collaborative and mentoring environment of the NIDA intramural research program (IRP) and then to continue their careers (the extramural phase) at an institution of their choice.

Individuals with a research or health professional doctoral level degree or equivalent who are recognized by their peers and mentors as exceptional, but with no more than 5 years of postdoctoral research training at the time of receiving the award, are eligible. The maximum total period of combined intramural support at NIDA and at the extramural institution as a NIDA Scholar will be 6 years. Initially, from 2-4 years of the Scholar's research program will be an Intramural Support Phase in which the salary and the research costs of the successful scholar will be derived entirely from NIDA intramural resources. The final 2 years of the Scholar's research program will be supported by a competitive K22 award to the extramural institution to which the Scholar is recruited.

To apply for the initial IRP experience, applicants should see the instructions on the PA. Entry into the Intramural Phase of the program does not require the completion of the grant application form PHS 398 application.

Mentored Research Scientist Development Award—K01 [PhD, supervised, minority]
Grant Instructions

The Mentored Research Scientist Development Award provides an additional period of sponsored support in an area new to the candidate or in an area that would enhance the candidate's scientific career. It is expected that, following this experience, the candidate will be able to pursue an independent and productive research career. Faculty members at institutions with a substantial minority enrollment who wish to enhance their research skills may apply.

Candidates for this award should hold a health-related doctoral degree or equivalent. The award period is 3 to 5 years, and applicants must justify the need for this period of mentored research experience, as well as provide evidence that this experience will enhance his or her career and allow the pursuit of a novel approach to a particular research problem. An experienced mentor must be identified, and the candidate must be willing to spend a minimum of 75 percent full professional effort conducting this research.

All applicants should contact the prospective NIH awarding component or the specific Program Announcement since the conditions of the award, such as eligibility requirements, length of award, limits on salary, research training, and research support costs, vary among the institutes. To apply for this grant, fill out the PHS 398 form and submit it to the NIH. See the application. The completed original application and five legible copies must be sent or delivered to: Center For Scientific Review, National Institutes Of Health, 6701 Rockledge Drive, Room 1040 - MSC 7710, Bethesda, Md 20892-7710.

Click here for tips on applying for "F" and "K" series awards.

Mentored Clinical Scientist Development Award—K08 [PhD, supervised]
Grant Instructions

This award supports a period of mentored research study for clinical professionals who wish to develop into independent investigators. The award supports a 3-, 4-, or 5-year period of supervised research experience that may integrate didactic studies with laboratory or clinically based research.

Candidates should hold a clinical doctoral degree and should have initiated postgraduate clinical training. The candidate must identify a mentor with extensive research experience and must devote 75 percentage effort to research career development activities during the period of the award.

Applications for this grant should be submitted using the PHS 398 form. Applicants are encouraged to contact a staff member at the appropriate institute before completing an application. For more information about this funding mechanism and a list of staff contacts, refer to the PA.

Click here for tips on applying for "F" and "K" series awards.

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Mentored Clinical Scientist Development Program Award—K12 [university]
Grant Instructions

The Mentored Clinical Scientist Development Program Award (MCSDPA) (K12) provides support to educational institutions for career development experiences for clinicians leading to research independence. Newly trained clinicians are selected and appointed to this program by the grantee institution. This funding mechanism is supported by the National Institute on Aging, the National Institute on Dental Research, and the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

Applications will be accepted from professional organizations, departments or divisions of domestic or non-Federal organizations, such as medical, dental, or nursing schools, or from comparable institutions with strong research and training programs. The applicant institution must have adequate numbers of highly trained faculty in clinical and basic sciences who are interested in serving as mentors. Once an MCSDPA has been awarded, institutions may recruit and select trainee candidates on a local basis.

This program award provides 5 years of support and is renewable. Trainees may receive 3 to 5 years of support. Trainees must have a clinical degree or equivalent degree and must spend at least 75 percent of their time conducting research or in career development or research-related activities.

Applications for this grant should be submitted using the PHS 398 form. Applications will be received on February 1, June 1, and October 1. For more information about this funding mechanism and a list of institute contacts, see the PA.

Click here for tips on applying for "F" and "K" series awards.

Mentored Patient-Oriented Research Career Development Award—K24 [patient, supervised, PhD]
Grant Instructions

This award is meant to support a period of supervised study and research for clinically trained professionals committed to patient-oriented research. Patient-oriented research is defined as research conducted with human subjects or on material of human origin (for example, tissue) involving direct interaction between the investigator and human subjects. This award is intended to increase the availability of high-quality, multidisciplinary training so that candidates interested in clinical research will be well grounded in research on human subjects. Further, this award is intended to prepare individuals with the knowledge and skills necessary to obtain independent research support. To this end, 75 percent of the recipient's full-time professional effort must be devoted to this research.

The candidate should possess a clinical degree or its equivalent and propose a field of study consistent with his or her previous experience. In addition, the program should be tailored to meet the needs of the candidate and include a mentor who is competent to provide the appropriate research guidance.

Former PIs on an NIH research grant (aside from R03 and R21) are not eligible. This award allows 3 to 5 years of study.

The PHS 398 form is used to apply for this grant. However, there are specific requirements for the completion of the text of the application. Please be sure to read the instructions. Further information on the grant type is available from the PA and NIH project staff at the appropriate institution.

Click here for tips on applying for "F" and "K" series awards.

Mentored Quantitative Research Career Development Award-K25

The purpose of the Mentored Quantitative Research Career Development Award is to encourage research-oriented quantitative scientists and engineers with little or no experience in biology or biomedicine to develop independent research skills and gain experience in advanced methods and experimental approaches that will allow them to conduct basic or clinical biomedical, behavioral or bioengineering research, or to play leading roles in multi-disciplinary research teams.

This award enables candidates holding degrees in quantitative sciences to undertake three to five years of special study and supervised research with the goal of developing into independent investigators capable of conducting quantitative research. Candidates must have demonstrated research interests with an advanced degree in a quantitative area of science or engineering: M.S.E.E., Ph.D., D.Sc., etc. They must identify a mentor with extensive behavioral or biomedical research experience. Candidates must be willing to spend 75 percent of full-time professional effort conducting research career development and basic or clinical research. The award is not renewable.

Potential applicants are strongly encouraged to contact the staff person in the relevant institute or center. The contact person at NIAAA and NIDA are as follows:

Michael J. Eckardt, Ph.D.
Office of Scientific Affairs
NIAAA
Willco Building, Room 409
6000 Executive Boulevard
Bethesda, MD 20892-7003
Phone: (301) 443-6107
Email: me25t@nih.gov

or

Gary Fleming
Grants Management Office
NIDA
6001 Executive Blvd., Room 3131, MSC 9541
Bethesda, MD 20892-9541
Phone: (301) 443-6710
Email: gf6s@nih.gov

Applications for the K25 award should be submitted using the PHS 398 form. See the PA for additional information.

RESEARCH AWARDS

Academic Research Enhancement Awards (AREA)—R15 [university, new, PhD]
Grant Instructions

This grant supports small-scale research projects. AREA funds are intended to support new or ongoing health-related research projects proposed by faculty members of educational institutions that have not been major recipients of NIH fiscal support. A list of ineligible schools/components can be found on the AREA Web page. If the name of the school does not appear on the list, it may be eligible to apply for AREA grants.

Supported investigators are anticipated to benefit from the opportunity to conduct independent research; in addition, the investigator's institution is hoped to benefit from a strengthened research environment and participation in an NIH extramural program. The university will be further strengthened by the inclusion of students in research activities.

Awards are for up to $75,000 for direct and indirect costs for up to 3 years. In any 1 year of the grant period, no more than $35,000 in direct costs can be requested. In addition, the proposed PI cannot be the PI on any other active NIH research grant at the time of award.

Due to the eligibility requirements of this grant, interested individuals are strongly urged to request further information from an AREA program contact in the appropriate institution.

The PHS 398 form is used to apply for this grant.

Behavioral Science Track Award for Rapid Transition (B/START) [PhD, new, short]
Grant Instructions

The B/START grant is designed to support newly independent investigators. Under this grant, support is typically provided for pilot work or preliminary data acquisition, new research approaches, or developing the skills of new behavioral science investigators.

The PI must be at the beginning of a research career; although individuals in training may apply for a B/START grant, no award will be made until training is completed. Individuals who have previously served as a PI on a Public Health Services (PHS)-supported research project are not eligible for this grant.

This grant provides no more than $50,000 in funding for a 1-year period. Generally speaking, B/START grant applications undergo rapid review and funding decision. The award is not renewable.

Applications are to be submitted on the PHS 398 form. Before applying, be sure to contact the appropriate NIH institute for specific instructions because not all institutes support this award.

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Small Grant Award—R03 [PhD, new, short]
Grant Instructions

The R03 is a small grant program designed to support researchers in the following categories: (1) newer or less-experienced investigators; (2) investigators at institutions without well-developed research resources; (3) experienced investigators conducting exploratory studies in a new research area; and (4) experienced investigators testing new methods and techniques. Applicants must address which one of these categories they fall under.

The R03 provides support for research limited in time and amount, and provides flexibility to initiate studies in a preliminary or short-term project. This grant has a duration of 2 years and provides a maximum dollar amount of $50,000 per year in direct costs. The award is not renewable.

Because small grants have special application formats, interested individuals are strongly encouraged to consult with program staff at the proper branch of the NIH. A list of contact people can be found in the program announcement. Generally speaking, the PHS 398 form is used to apply for this grant. The completed original application and five legible copies must be sent or delivered to: Center For Scientific Review, National Institutes Of Health, 6701 Rockledge Drive, Room 1040 - MSC 7710, Bethesda, Md 20892-7710.

Exploratory or Developmental Grants—R21 [new, PhD]
Grant Instructions

The objective of the R21 funding mechanism is to encourage applications from individuals who are interested in testing innovative or conceptually creative ideas that are scientifically sound and may advance our understanding of drug abuse and addictions. Another objective is to encourage necessary initial development to provide a basis for important future research in a particular field.

This grant is not intended to support large-scale undertakings, nor to support or supplement ongoing research. Instead, it is more to establish a research base for a future application under a different type of funding mechanism (R01).

The requested funding is expected to be modest. A grant supported under the R21 mechanism is limited to a 3-year effort and a maximum of $100,000 in direct costs per year, for most institutes (some institutes have a $75,000 maximum). These awards are not renewable.

For additional information about R21 grants, contact the appropriate granting institution. The PHS 398 form is used to apply for this grant.
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Academic Career Award—Development (K07); [PhD, supervised, university]
Grant Instructions

This award is used to support individuals interested in introducing or improving curriculum in a particular scientific field as a means of enhancing the educational or research capacity at the applicant's institution. This award supports two types of activities: development and leadership. The development award is designed for more junior candidates who are interested in developing an academic or research expertise in a particular field. During the 5 year period for this award, the applicant will become a successful academic in the chosen area by teaching, researching, building curricula, and learning leadership skills over the course of the award. For junior candidates, a mentor is required. The leadership award, which lasts from 2 to 5 years, is designed to support more senior individuals with acknowledged scientific expertise in the chosen area who are interested in improving the curricula and enhancing the research capacity within an academic institution.

Candidates for this award must have a clinical or research doctoral degree. Not all institutes of the NIH offer this award. Interested individuals are encouraged to contact program staff from supporting institutes (as listed in the PA) prior to preparing an application.

Applications for this grant should include a description of the candidate, a career development plan, a research plan, a demonstrated institutional commitment, a mentor's statement, and a budget, and should be submitted on the PHS 398 grant application form.

For more information on this funding mechanism, a description of application requirements, and a list of institute contacts, refer to the PA.

Click here for tips on applying for "F" and "K" series awards.

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Research Project Grant—R01 [PhD]
Grant Instructions

This grant is considered to be the NIH's foremost investigator-initiated grant award for individual researchers. The R01 grant is well suited for definitive studies, often part of a long-term research program, and in the investigator's specific field of interest. Research project grants are awarded to institutions on behalf of a Principal Investigator to facilitate pursuit of a scientific focus or objective in the area of the investigator's interest and competence. Institutional sponsorship assures the NIH that the institution will provide facilities necessary to accomplish the research and will be accountable for the grant funds. Applications are accepted for health-related research and development in all areas within the scope of the NIH's mission.

This grant has a duration of up to 5 years, with no maximum dollar amount on direct costs. Requested funds over $500,000 need to be approved by the NIH program staff.

To apply for this grant, fill out the PHS 398 form. The completed original application and five legible copies must be sent or delivered to: Center For Scientific Review, National Institutes Of Health, 6701 Rockledge Drive, Room 1040 - MSC 7710, Bethesda, Md 20892-7710.

 

CAREER: MIDDLE

Independent Scientist Award—K02 [PhD, new]
Grant Instructions

The Independent Scientist Award provides support for newly independent scientists who can demonstrate the need for a period of intensive research focus as a means of enhancing their research careers. The candidate should hold a doctoral degree and have peer-reviewed, independent research support or have work that is primarily theoretical in the absence of support. In addition, the candidate must demonstrate that the requested period of research focus will foster his or her career as a highly productive scientist.

The project period of support for the award is 5 years and may be renewed once at the discretion of the funding agency.

Since some of the NIH institutes and centers may not participate in this program or may have different award provisions, it is strongly recommended that prospective applicants contact an NIH program official at the appropriate agency. For a list of contacts, see the PA.

To apply for this grant, fill out the PHS 398 form and submit to the appropriate funding institute.

Click here for tips on applying for "F" and "K" series awards.

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Midcareer Investigator Award in Patient-Oriented Research—K24 [PhD, patient]
Grant Instructions

The purpose of the Midcareer Investigator Award in Patient-Oriented Research is to provide support for clinicians to allow them protected time to devote to patient-oriented research and to act as mentors for beginning clinical investigators. The target candidates are outstanding clinical scientists engaged in patient-oriented research who are within 15 years of their specialty training, who can demonstrate the need for a period of intensive research focus as a means of enhancing their clinical research careers, and who are committed to mentoring the next generation of clinical investigators focusing on patient-oriented research. The award is intended to further the research and mentoring endeavors of outstanding patient-oriented investigators to enable them to expand their potential to make significant contributions to their field of patient-oriented research, and to act as mentors for beginning clinicians.

Candidates for this award must have a clinical or equivalent degree, such as MD, DO, DDS, DMD, OD, DC, or may hold a PhD degree if they have been certified to perform clinical duties. Awardees may undertake up to 5 years (minimum of 3 years) of patient-oriented research, which will allow them to further develop their research skills and act as a mentor to beginning clinical researchers. Applicants should be willing to spend at least 25 percent effort (up to 50 percent) conducting patient-oriented research and mentoring.

Applications for this award should be completed using the PHS 398 form. Applicants are strongly encouraged to contact staff in the relevant institute. For a list of staff contacts, and more information about the K24 award, consult the PA.

Click here for tips on applying for "F" and "K" series awards.

Minority Institutions Drug Abuse Research Development Grant (MIDARP) [minority, university]
Grant Instructions

Under this grant, faculty and staff at institutions with a substantial minority enrollment may obtain funds in order to (1) create or strengthen the institute's research infrastructure, and (2) complete individual research project(s). A core research issue or focus area must be identified. Research may be in any area supported by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, including the areas of neuroscience; behavioral, clinical, and social science; public health, biological, HIV/AIDS, and health services.

This funding mechanism gives researchers at minority institutions an opportunity to expand the research capacity of their departments and universities by providing funding for such infrastructure enhancements as lab supplies, data management and statistical analysis needs, special courses or seminars for faculty or students, pilot work that can form the basis for individual research projects or library resources. In addition, at least one individual research project must be proposed in the chosen research area. The expectation is that by supporting both institutional infrastructure and an individual research project, project investigators will be competitive in other sponsored research programs.

Applications for this grant should be submitted on the PHS 398 grant application form. A submission for this funding mechanism should contain both an institutional research development plan (no longer than 25 pages) and a description of each individual investigator project (no longer than 20 pages each). Refer to the PA, PAR-98-001, in your submission.

For more information on this funding mechanism, application requirements, and review criteria, refer to the PA or contact one of the following NIDA personnel:

Lula Beatty, PhD, Special Populations Office
National Institute on Drug Abuse
6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 4216, MSC 9567
Bethesda, MD 20892
(301) 443-0441
lb75x@nih.gov

Pushpa Thadani, PhD, Division of Basic Research
National Institute on Drug Abuse
6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 4282, MSC 9555
Bethesda, MD 20892
(301) 443-6300
pt24e@nih.gov

Jagjitsing Khalsa, PhD, Division of Clinical and Services Research
National Institute on Drug Abuse
6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 5198, MSC 9593
Bethesda, MD 20892
(301) 443-1801
jk98p@nih.gov

Arnold R. Mills, MSW, Division of Epidemiology and Prevention Research
National Institute on Drug Abuse
6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 5N-5160, MSC 9589
Bethesda, Maryland 20892-5989
(301) 402-1935
am88k@nih.gov

Research Supplements for Under Represented Minorities [minority, student, PhD]
Grant Instructions

Administrative supplements are available to support students and researchers from underrepresented minority groups who are interested in contributing to NIH research projects. The Research Supplements for Under Represented Minorities program allows PIs holding the NIH research grants to apply for supplements to recruit and support minority investigators and students. Minority students and researchers from high school to the faculty level are eligible to be supported by these supplements.

Researchers and students from underrepresented minority groups who are interested in working under a supplement should first identify a project or PI to work with. NIH program staff may be able to assist candidates in locating potential placements. To apply for an administrative supplement, the grantee institution, on behalf of the PI and in cooperation with the minority researcher, must submit the request for supplemental funds directly to the institution that awarded the parent grant.

An application for a supplement may be submitted at any time. For detailed application instructions and a list of agency contacts, refer to the PA.

Click here for a list of NIH institute staff contacts.

Extramural Associates Research Development Award (Extramural Associates Program) [minority, university]
Grant Instructions

The Extramural Associates Program (EAP) is designed to promote the entry and participation of underrepresented minority and women's institutions into biomedical and behavioral research. In order to achieve this goal, the EAP offers two options for support: (1) the Sponsored Research Infrastructure Program, a 5 month residential program at the NIH in Bethesda, Maryland; and (2) the Faculty Research Enhancement Support Program, a 10-week residential program at the NIH. In addition to residential experience, Research Development Awards typically include 3 years of financial support in order to facilitate research activity at the applicant's home institution.

The residential program at the NIH allows faculty from minority institutions to work with NIH staff, create a network of contacts at the NIH and other Federal agencies, create a plan to expand the research infrastructure at their own institution, and learn about Federal funding opportunities. Upon return, the NIH-trained associate will assume an active role in promoting and expanding opportunities for faculty and students to participate in biomedical and behavioral research.

Applications for the Extramural Associates Research Development Award must be responsive to the current RFA. To obtain a copy of the RFA or to learn more about the program, contact:

Dr. Matthew Kinnard, Director
Extramural Associates Program
National Institutes of Health
6701 Rockledge Drive
Rockledge II, Room 6187A
Bethesda, MD 20892-7910
Phone: (301) 435-2736
E-mail: MK51q@nih.gov,

 

CAREER AWARDS

CAREER: SENIOR

Senior Scientist Award—K05 [PhD, senior]
Grant Instructions

The Senior Scientist Award is for a senior scientist who is a recognized leader in their field with a distinguished record of original contributions. The award provides salary support for award periods of up to five years (at least three years are required) as a means of enhancing the recipient's skill and dedication to his or her area of research. Candidates should have research support at the time of the award. Awards are renewable if permitted by the policies of the NIH awarding component and the candidate still meets the stated requirements.

Potential applicants should contact the appropriate NIH program staff prior to preparing an application, as not all of the NIH centers and institutes support this award. To apply for this grant, fill out the PHS 398 form.

For more information on this funding mechanism, application requirements, and review criterion, refer to the PA.

Click here for tips on applying for "F" and "K" series awards.

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OTHER AWARDS

Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) Program [product]
Grant Instructions

The SBIR program is designed to support small businesses (less than 500 employees) in the development and evaluation of an innovative commercial product related to the mission of the NIH institutes. SBIR grants are awarded in two phases: in Phase I, which lasts 6 months, $100,000 is awarded to support the development of a product. Phase II, which is $750,000 over 2 years, is to support the evaluation and refinement of this product. A new initiative, the Fast-Track application, allows for simultaneous application and award of the Phase I and II proposals. The applicant must have a small business.

The SBIR program is a unique type of grant with both strict research requirements and additional required information related to product development. Potential applicants are strongly advised to seek guidance from a program official at the funding agency. The PHS 6246-1 application forms are used to apply for SBIR grants and can be found on the NIH forms page. These forms are updated annually.

Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Program [product, collaborative]
Grant Instructions

The STTR supports innovative research that has the potential for commercialization of a product. The research must be conducted cooperatively by a small business and a research institution. At least 40 percent of the research project is to be conducted by the small business and at least 30 percent of the work is to be conducted by the partnering research institution.

Support under the STTR program is normally provided for 6 months and $100,000 for Phase I, with 2 years and $500,000 for Phase II. A new initiative, the Fast-Track application, allows for simultaneous application and award of the Phase I and II proposals.

The STTR program is a unique kind of grant with both strict research requirements and additional required information related to product development. Potential applicants are strongly advised to seek guidance from a program official at the funding agency. The PHS 6246-3 forms are used to apply for Phase I STTR grants, and they can be found on the NIH forms page. These forms are updated annually.

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Research Center Grants [university]
Grant Instructions

These grants are designed to facilitate the formation of multidisciplinary research centers dedicated to a comprehensive research program in a particular area of health. Research centers should focus on an overarching theme (be thematically integrated) and should foster original and creative scientific contributions that could not result if each component existed independently. Three different mechanisms of support are available for the formation of a research center:

  1. Core Support Center Grants (P30). This grant is intended to bring together researchers currently funded by other sources (either Federal or non-Federal) to create a research center. Under this federal grant, funds are available to develop a supported research infrastructure for the individuals involved; this grant is not meant to support individual researchers. Funds under this mechanism may be used, for example, for administrative coordination, equipment and laboratories, and statistical analysis. Applicants must demonstrate how supporting a research center would enhance the potential contribution of individually funded projects. P30 applicants may apply for up to 5 years of support.

  2. Specialized Center Grants (P50). This grant provides support for the creation of a broadly based, multidisciplinary research center. Each research component must be systematically related both to some other components and to the core infrastructure of the research center. Research centers created under this funding mechanism should also serve as training and mentoring facilities. P50 applicants may apply for up to 5 years of support.

  3. Comprehensive Center Grants (P60). Research centers created by the P60 mechanism are expected to encompass all of the components described above, plus serve as a meeting ground for divergent but related research within a given community. Comprehensive research center grants support continuing education, information dissemination to the public, and components of basic clinical, epidemiological, and preventive services. P60 applicants may apply for up to 5 years of support.

Applications for this grant should be submitted using the PHS 398 form. For more information on this funding mechanism, refer to the PA.

Note: Some items in this section are available for downloading in Adobe Acrobat (PDF) format, which allows the document to be downloaded, viewed, and printed with all of its original formatting. To view files in this format, you must first download a copy of the Adobe Acrobat Reader and follow the instructions for installation.

  

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Last updated: August 12, 2003.